New Episode! “T.n.T. (Terror ‘n Tinseltown)”

hollywood-full

88th Academy Awards with Chris Rock, Angela Bassett, Louis C.K., and Leonardo DiCaprio produced by David Hill and Reginald Hudlin. Directed by Glenn Weiss.

“Act Naturally” (Johnny Russell/Voni Morrison) by Buck Owens and the Buckaroos.
“Til It Happens to You” (Lady Gaga/Diane Warren) by Lady Gaga.
“Mad Max: Fury Road” (a 2015 film directed by George Miller)
“The Road Warrior” (a 1982 film directed by George Miller)
“Bridge Of Spies” (a 2015 film directed by Steven Spielberg)
“Pulp Fiction” (a 1994 film directed by Quentin Tarantino)
“Cast Away” (a 2000 film directed by Robert Zemeckis)
“Joe Versus The Volcano” (1990 film directed by John Patrick Shanley)
“A Woman Under The Influence” (a 1974 film directed by John Cassavettes)
“Batman Begins” (a 2005 film directed by Christopher Nolan)
“Daughters Of Darkness” (a 1971 film directed by Harry Kümel)
“That’s Action!” (1991 film directed by David A. Prior)
“Expert Village” with Kevin Lindenmuth.
“Point Break” (a 1991 film directed by Kathryn Bigelow)
“Point Break” (a 2015 film directed by Ericson Core)
“Open Up Your Heart (And Let the Sunshine In)” (Stuart Hamblen) by Pebbles and Bamm Bamm.

© BlissVille, David Lawler copyright 2016 for all original vocal and audio content featuring David Lawler and selected guests each episode.  Any and all images, audio clips, and dialogue extracts are the property of their respective copyright owners.  This blog and podcast was created for criticism, research, and is completely nonprofit, and should be considered Fair Use as stated in the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. section 107.  It is not an official product, and it should not be sold nor bought; this is intended for private use, and any public broadcast is not recommended. All music clips appear under Fair Use as well.

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NEW PODCAST: “Nothing Will Happen Suddenly”

TekWar-Laserdisc

 

I don’t regularly watch movies on Laserdisc, just those titles you can’t find anywhere, and this is what’s troubling to me. Consider that you have nearly every movie made eventually mass-produced for VHS, and then only a very small fraction of those titles were produced and marketed for Laserdisc. A larger percentage of those titles were produced for DVD, but not nearly as many for VHS, right? Blu Ray comes along and it’s, once again, a fraction of the titles produced for DVD, more than Laserdisc but still fewer and far between. Specialty companies, like (I’m reminded of Twilight Time and Criterion), come out and cost upwards of $50 because they’re on limited runs and Blu Rays are expensive to produce and distribute, so we’re getting fewer titles because streaming is popular. You’re not going to get those hard-to-find titles on Blu Ray because it’s a niche market and not worth re-couping production-run costs.

So I watched the documentary, “Rewind This!”, about the enclave of devoted VHS collectors, some of them famous, a lot of them with big basements and media rooms, who proudly display their wares. They know that physical product is on it’s way out, that this is something the Studios and Networks have wanted for years – the ability to control their own distribution, their own exhibition.

Remember Sony Corp. vs. Universal, 1984. Universal Studios sued Sony for developing home video recording technology, which is strange considering video recorders had been on the market for around 20 years before this case went to trial. I think it was only when prices went down and more people were buying VCRs that Universal realized they might lose money in the rental market. Then copy-guard and Macrovision and other copy protection devices were introduced to keep people from dubbing movies. I think Universal was the first company to use copy-protection, after MCA Videocassette, Inc. was dissolved and MCA Home Video was formed.